Wellness

Long Weekend Roundup

Weekend Roundup

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Make the Most of Your Holiday Weekend

Labor Day, MLK Day, Memorial Day. Federal holidays lead to long weekends and mini-vacations that herald the start of a new chapter, signal the end of a season or maybe just offer a brief change from your weekly routine.

To ensure you have the best long weekend possible, we’ve gathered some of our best tips for you.

Your Bags Are Packed and You’re Ready to Go

A Road Map to Health on the Road
A road trip is as much about the journey as the destination. From smart eating, proper hydration and good driving posture, to comfortable attire, periodic stretch breaks and the right sun protection, these healthy tips will ensure you have a healthy weekend getaway. Read the full article here.

Health in Flight
Many people experience some form of discomfort or sickness when they travel by plane. Dry mouth, aching limbs, swollen ankles — they’re par for the course on plane rides, but you can take a few steps to feel your best when you’re up in the air. Read the full article here.

6 Steps to Stay Healthy While You’re Away
Vacations can be great: the opportunity to get away from daily stress, explore new places and indulge in favorite pastimes can keep you relaxed and well, but a virus caught on the plane or nausea from something in the water can put a damper on an otherwise exceptional experience. Here are a few simple steps to avoid these situations on your next trip. Read the full article here.

3 Tips for a Stress-Free Short Trip
Long weekends offer a much-anticipated opportunity for travel and relaxation. Leisure activities can lower stress hormones and blood pressure, generally making you feel better. However, depending on the destination and occasion, a weekend getaway can bring stressors of its own. Read the full article here.

It’s Always the Right Time to Practice Warm Weather Safety

Sun Day Safety 101
After a streak of bleak weather – or too much time in the office – sunlight can feel like just what the doctor ordered. So how can you balance beneficial time outside with the care to keep your skin safe? Learn about the guidelines you should follow to protect yourself against skin damage. Read the full article here.

A Guide to SPF and Sun Protection [Infographic]
It’s happened before. Whatever the reason, you forget to apply sunscreen until you begin feeling warm and uncomfortable. Spending time outside with friends and family is a highlight of a long holiday weekend, but it doesn’t need to be permanently etched on your skin because of sun damage. See the infographic here.

Too Hot to Handle
When it’s too hot or humid, your body can’t adequately cool off and when that happens, your body can overheat, resulting in a heat-related illness. Heat-related illness takes five primary forms: sunburn, heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Read the full article here.

You’re Out and About – in the Great Outdoors

Little Buggers [Infographic]
Bug bites are no fun, and they have an unfortunate tendency to increase in incidence with time spent outside. While mosquitos and ticks may get the most attention, spiders, wasps and fire ants can make themselves known, too. Make sure you know what to do if you find yourself with a bite. See the infographic here.

Beat the Bugs: Skincare for the Outdoors
You know what to do about sun exposure, but when you’re exposed and outside, your skin can be at risk for more than just sunburn. Most of the time, bugs are just nuisances, but protection tips and warning signs can keep your skin safe. Read the full article here.

An Eye on Lyme Disease
Lyme disease affects people of all ages in all parts of United States, but it’s most common in children and older adults with a particularly high incidence in the Midwest. It’s important to recognize Lyme disease and to take preventive measures when you’re outdoors. Read the full article here.

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