Nutrition

Comfort Food That’s Good for You

Heart healthier chili comfort food

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Heart Healthier Spins on Favorite Comfort Foods

When winter sets in and you’re craving something rich and filling, comfort food can seem at absolute odds with your New Year’s resolution to eat well. But a few strategic substitutions can offer heart-friendly renditions of heart-warming meals.

Comfort food is traditionally high in calories and saturated fat, so look for fat-free or low fat dairy products, replace beef with turkey or other lean options and use whole-wheat pasta and flour. Home cooking can improve the healthiness of comfort foods considerably: Homemade soup has significantly less sodium than canned soup. Try baking instead of pan or deep frying, using flavor boosting spices and herbs to enhance lean meats and opting for cocoa powder over chocolate.

Certain comfort foods even bring their own benefits to the table. Spinach lasagna can provide a third of your daily fiber and tomato sauce is rich in antioxidants. A mixed berry cobbler with cornmeal crust also offers antioxidants along with vitamin rich berries.

Discover nutritious spins on your favorite comfort foods and find more recipes with Prevention, Eating Well and the Food Network.

Here are some of our favorites:

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